September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month

Childhood Cancer Awareness Month is a time when we celebrate advances in childhood cancer treatment and care, remember the children we've lost, and engage new advocates to join in our mission of achieving a day when every child with cancer can live a long and healthy life. We'll be sharing news all month long, bringing you highlights from Washington, DC, and around the country. Be sure you're following us on Facebook and Twitter for breaking news, live updates, and shareable graphics designed to help spread awareness among the general public.

 
 
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AWARENESS MONTH EVENTS

Washington, DC: The childhood cancer community will come together for a jam-packed extended weekend in the nation's capital from September 19th through the 23rd. Here are some of the highlights:

  • Friday, September 20: The 10th Annual Congressional Childhood Cancer Caucus Summit takes place at 9am on Capitol Hill. The Summit will focus on "the successes of the past decade, and what we will be working on during the next decade" and will feature Dr. David Poplack as the keynote speaker. Dr. Poplack is a former Children's Cause Board Member, and we look forward to hearing his report on building global capacity to fight childhood cancer. The public is welcome to attend the Summit but pre-registration is required: RSVP here.

  • Saturday, September 21: CureFest kicks off with a Rally to the Capitol, Meet & Greet on Freedom Plaza, and Night of Golden Lights. More information on these events (plus a kids' lobby day on Friday) can be found on the CureFest website.

  • Sunday, September 22: The biggest event of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month takes place on the National Mall - CureFest! The opening celebration begins at 10am with an organized walk at noon, and the headlining musical act - Daughtry Acoustic Trio - at 1pm. The Children's Cause is a proud sponsor of CureFest, and we hope that you'll stop by our booth to say hello and pick up some freebies!

 

FACTS ABOUT CHILDHOOD CANCER

  • 43 children per day or 15,780 children per year are expected to be diagnosed with cancer.

  • Childhood cancer is not one disease – there are more than 12 major types of pediatric cancers and over 100 subtypes.

  • Cancer is the number one cause of death by disease among children.

  • About thirty five percent of children diagnosed with cancer will die within 30 years of diagnosis.

  • Since 1980, only four drugs have been approved in the first instance for use in children. This is compared with hundreds of drugs that have been developed specifically for adults only. Equally important, for many of the childhood cancers, the same treatments that existed in the 1970’s continue with few, if any, changes.

  • In 2013 there were nearly 390,000 childhood cancer survivors in the United States. This number is projected to grow to more than 500,000 by 2020.

  • More than 95% of childhood cancer survivors will have a significant health related issue by the time they are 45 years of age (2); these health related issues are side-effects of either the cancer or more commonly, the result of its treatment.

Source: Coalition Against Childhood Cancer (CAC2)

 
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WHAT CAN I DO?

  • Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram for updates all month long. Use hashtags #CCAM, #GOLDSTRONG, and #KickChildhoodCancer to share your own awareness stories in social media. Major League Soccer is donating $1 to the Children’s Oncology Group for every tweet that uses the #KickChildhoodCancer hashtag this month!

  • There are plenty more events happening during September, both in DC and around the country, and we encourage you to check out the Coalition Against Childhood Cancer's Events Calendar to see if there's something going on in your area. If you know of an event or a planned illumination in your area, please take a moment to add it to the map.

  • If you're a childhood cancer survivor or the loved one of a child who had or has cancer, your story can help others. Your voice could be the one to encourage a family who is facing a new diagnosis, motivate a policymaker to take action, or inspire a generous benefactor with time or money who is looking for a cause to support. Share your story here.